Review of Koh-I-Noor Woodless Color Pencils (12 Pack)

I bought these pencils in January from Amazon. Although they were only $7.91 at the time, I did have high expectations due to the positive reviews.

These did not disappoint. Unlike most other pencils, they are made entirely of graphite. Instead of a wooden outer layer, there is a lacquer based coating to prevent the color from coming off on your hands. Continue reading “Review of Koh-I-Noor Woodless Color Pencils (12 Pack)”

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Review of the Oxford University Press edition of “Songs of Innocence & of Experience” by William Blake

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Virtually unknown during his lifetime, William Blake is now viewed as one of the greatest artists and poets of his or any time, which I enthusiastically agree with. I first came across his work while in school. His poem, “The Chimney Sweeper,” is often taught to illustrate Continue reading “Review of the Oxford University Press edition of “Songs of Innocence & of Experience” by William Blake”

Rembrant (1936) Film Review

I watched this film a few nights ago on TCM.

It starred Charles Laughton as Rembrandt van Rijn. The film begins at the time in his life when he was very popular & accepted in society.

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(Rembrandt van Rijn, Officers and Men of the Amsterdam Kloveniers Militia, the Company of Captain Frans Banning Cocq, signed and dated ‘Rembrandt f 1642’, canvas, 363 x 438 cm, Amsterdam, Rijksmuseum)

But after the death of his wife, Rembrandt’s artwork became darker. Continue reading “Rembrant (1936) Film Review”

Dante’s Divine Comedy Vol. 1: Inferno – A Short Review

The first book of 2016 that I have finished reading is the first part of Dante’s Divine Comedy, Inferno.

The edition I read is translated by Mark Musa & published by Penguin Classics.

Musa’s blank verse translation makes the epic poem flow effortlessly, & his commentary makes it easy to understand.

The beauty & horror of Dante’s vision has left a huge impression on me.  Graphic descriptions of sinners being punished in various levels of hell left me feeling shocked & horrified.

For example, Canto 28 begins:

“Who could, even in the simplest kind of prose

describe in full the scene of blood & wounds

that I saw now-no matter how hard he tried!”

That is a rather tame quote from the Inferno, but it is a great example of how the reader is left in anticipation of the horrors to come.

I recommend this translation of the Inferno to anyone like me who has never read Dante or The Divine Comedy before.

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